Volume 8, Issue 3 (12-2018)                   cmja 2018, 8(3): 2341-2353 | Back to browse issues page

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Fereshteh J, Chamani M, Samani L, haghani H, mojab F. Comparison of the Effect of Omega3 and Folic Acid on Hot Flashes in Menopausal Women . cmja. 2018; 8 (3) :2341-2353
URL: http://cmja.arakmu.ac.ir/article-1-586-en.html
Candidate in Midwifery, Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran , m66.chamani@gmail.com
Abstract:   (328 Views)
Background: Hot flashes are the most common symptoms of menopause affecting the social life, mental and psychological states and overall quality of life of women.
Materials and Methods: The study was a triple-blind clinical trial. After obtaining written consents, the participants were randomly assigned to three 40-member groups of omega-3 (1000 mg / day), folic acid (1mg / day) and placebo. The data were collected through a demographic questionnaire and daily registration forms to examine the intensity, duration and number of hot flashes experienced by the participants two weeks before the intervention and one, two and three months after the beginning of the intervention. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage frequency, mean and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (Chi-square, Fisher exact, ANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA) using SPSS 22.
Results: The mean intensity of hot flashes one month after the intervention was significantly different among the three groups (p =0.045). Two months after the intervention, the results of Scheffe's test showed a significant difference between folic acid and omega-3 groups (p = 0.021) and between folic acid and placebo groups in terms of intensity (p = 0.008). The mean intensity of hot flashes was lower in the folic acid group than that in the placebo three months after the intervention (p = 0.002). The mean duration of hot flashes was significantly different among the three groups two and three months after the intervention (p = 0.001). The mean number of hot flashes was lower in the folic acid group than that in the placebo group three months after the intervention (p = 0.001).
Conclusion: In this study, 12 weeks of omega-3, folic acid, and placebo reduced the severity, duration and number of hot flashes, but the reduction was more evident in the folic acid group. Therefore, folic acid can be recommended to be used as the first line of treatment.
 
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Type of Study: Research | Subject: Nursing and Midwifery

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